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20121027
20121104
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)
have been working around the clock since sandy struck. abc's john schriffen spent the day with new york police search and rescue, in the air, on the water and on the ground, saving lives in the hardest-hit parts of the city. >> reporter: it's been five days since hurricane sandy made landfall. and from the sky to the sea, clear parts of new york city are still a mess. some areas are still flooded, buried in sand. just aren't there anymore. >> it's a little disturbing. a little heart wrenching. my neighborhood got hit hard also. >> reporter: to get a better idea of what new yorkers are going through, we followed the new york police department on a search and recovery mission. this was the scene tuesday, when the aviation team had to be lowered into the flood zones to rescue five adults and one child from the rooftops of their home. >> it was pretty daring. it was pretty intense. pretty stressful. but those guys pulled it off. >> reporter: we're now flying over staten island, the hardest of the five boroughs to get to. and the devastation is unimaginable. it almost looks like a wrecking b
could it be? believe it or not, this guy thinks he has an idea. a researcher at johns hopkins, he's predicted how many of us may lose power. remember, irene left 7 million without power. >> our model suggest 10 million. >> reporter: roughly 10 million without power for a week or more. if 50 million feel the effect of this, 1 in 5, could be without electricity. a very big storm coming our way. >> that's an unbelievable number. >>> we'll go back out to sam champion in new york city, in preparations under way for how this city, the largest city in the country, would deal with hurricane sandy. >> bianna, you know, we have seen storms move up this coastline and breeze by new york. only one hurricane in recent memory irene made a move to this city and the city got ready for it. forecasters are being careful to let folks know right away that this storm has more strong effects than irene may have had. new york city is operating under a state of emergency and wants everyone prepared today for a monday storm. boarding up homes and buildings. >> i'm really nervous about this. i am. i'm cooki
cities. john muller is in new york, where the storm surge hit so hard. john, good morning. >> reporter: good morning, amy. earlier this week, i would be underwater. much of lower manhattan was. it's dry. the storm has passed. it's easy to say it's behind us. it's not. make no mistake. it's just a matter of time before another storm hits. this is one of the problems, an aging infrastructure. this is the seawall. from a bygone era. experts say there's a way to prevent this. they say it's time to spend billions to save billions. experts now wonder if the massive storm surge that flooded lower manhattan and washed away parts of the jersey shore, could have been solved by sea barriers. some say that staten island began as a natural barrier island, but it became an urban landscape, taking away this natural shield. now, engineers are proposing massive shields like these walls. flood protections that were once considered unnecessary, are now being reconsidered after sandy's 14-foot surge. >> anybody who says there's not a dramatic change in weather patterns, i think is denying reality. >> repo
are scrambling to make sure preparations are in place. and abc's john schriffen has that part of the story from lower manhattan. good morning, john. >> reporter: good morning. we are here in battery park city, in what's now being called zone "a." 375,000 residents around the city live in the low-lying potential flood zones. you look at the water right now, it is calm. but when sandy comes through, it wouldn't take much for the water to come up over the walls. last year, for hurricane irene, these residents had to be evacuated. so, this time around, they're ready for the worst. east coast communities going on the offensive. building sand walls, securing property and stocking up on supplies, as the superstorm closes in. after being pounded last year by hurricane irene with its record storm surge and feet of flooding, new york residents are once again bracing for the worst. damage from irene topped $14 billion. and sandy could wreak even more havoc. >> certainly having lived through it. i lost everything in my basement. i had up to ten feet of water in my house. this is a concern. >> reporter: gov
. a researcher at johns hopkins, he's put together a model, predicting, how many of us may lose power. remember, irene left 7 million without power. >> our model suggesting 10 million. >> reporter: roughly 10 million without power for a week or more. if 50 million feel the effects of this, that's 1 in 5, could be without electricity. if you're inland, think again, it could be a bad one. dan and bianna. >> it will go well inland. david kerley, thank you for your reporting. >>> another breaking story we're watching closely. a massive earthquake off the west coast triggered a tsunami warning in hawaii. our worst fears quelled for now at least. on our affiliate reports. >> very serious situation in hawaii earl yi this evening. the civil service calling for a evacuation of the low-lying areas. caused by the 7.7 earthquake in canada. >> they're seeing the waves come in. it's still going to be a long night tonight. they'll have to wait at least a couple of more hours before they can consider lower that advisory. it appears that it's not going to be as bad as once predicted. >>> back out to sam, talk u
the world, special sea barriers made to protect cities. john muller is in battery park where the storm surge hit new york so hard. john, good morning. >> reporter: earlier this week i would be under water, so much of man hasn't was. easy to think the storm has passed, ground is dry and we're safe. make no mistake another storm is out there, just a matter of time. one of problems, the seawall, part of an aging infrastructure from a bygone era, much like lady liberty in the harbor. experts say there's a way to prevent this. they say it's time to spend billions to save billions. experts now wonder if the massive storm surge that flooded lower manhattan and washed away parts of the jersey shore, could have been solved by sea barriers. some scientists say staten island started as a natural barrier island but con trucks of roads, parking lots and homes created an urban landscape, taking away this natural shield. now, two european engineering firms are proposing massive shields like these walls. flood protections that were once considered unnecessary, are now being reconsidered after sandy's 14-foo
? believe it or not, this guy thinks he has an idea, a researcher at johns hopkins has put together a model predicting how many of us may lose power. remember, irene left 7 million without electricity. >> our model is suggesting roughly 10 million. >> reporter: 10 million who could be without power for a week or more. so we're talking about 50 million people may feel the effects of this storm. that means one in five potentially could see their lights go out. so if you're inland, and you don't think that these waves and this coastal impact is going to affect you, think again, it could be a bad one, dan and bianna. >> it will go well inland. we know that. from the meteorologists. david kerley, thank you for your reporting this morning. >>> meanwhile, 5,000 miles to the west there is another breaking story we're watching closely right now. a massive earthquake off the west coast triggered a tsunami warning for hawaii downgraded to an advisory, our worst fears quelled for now at least. now our affiliate in miami reports. >> reporter: very serious in hawaii. the civil defense calling for an evac
a mile from here. this is the "john b. caddell." it's been around since 1941. there was no one on it, nothing on it. let's stop for a second. to give people a bearing. people don't know staten island or new york. this is front street. this is actually a street so it ended up on the asphalt. this is the narrows. lower manhattan is right over there. and if we pan over here, there is the verrazano narrows bridge to let you know. and it was moored on the other side of that. you guys watch out. there are flares all over the place here. but staten island is just devastated here. people are coming out with their kids. no school, obviously, can't get to work. and there's just no public transportation and they've been coming here to see this sight because it looks like something out of a movie. don't get hit with this. it's just unbelievable. and they've been taking pictures. and just can't believe this but we're moving on from here. back to you, amy. unbelievable sight. >> it certainly shows the force and power of sandy. michelle charlesworth, thanks so much. >>> we want to go to more devast
. staten island. "the john b.caddell" supertanker washed ashore. many are waiting to be rescued there, as well. learning so much about the devastation caused by the superstorm. 17 people have lost their lives in the storm. >> here's what we know. 7.5 million people are right now out of power. a levee in new jersey breached overnight. entire towns are underwater right now. dramatic rescues taking place at this hour. >> and some of the terror and the devastations occurred at night. and the sun's rise now on so many communities, up and down the east coast. they wake up underwater this morning. there are huge potential health hazards once the floodwaters recede. dr. richard besser is here with what you need to know to protect yourself and your families from the dangers that could be lurking inside and around your flooded homes. >> and millions facing several days potentially without power. we have crucial safety tips to store food for your family. lara is near her family in connecticut. and the floodwaters have been devastating, as well. >> yes. for many, many here, thousands, it will be
to wabc's john delgiorno. john, i know firefighters can't get there yet. what are you seeing? >> this is about midway between the popular resort town seaside heights. this is a fire that's been burning for -- it has -- it looks like at least 10 to 15, maybe even more of these homes have been -- to the ground. the area right now, inaccessible from the mainland. this is a peninsula, accessible only by bridge. the nearest bridge right now, has been cut off. fire department -- even if they could, it looks as the storm surge came up, it deposited 10 to 15 feet of sand across the roadways. right now, no way to extinguish this fire in new jersey. back to times square. >> thanks so much. >>> we have more on the massive destruction on the jersey shore from the ground level. so much of that iconic beach town of seaside heights is underwater. full of debris there. part of the boardwalk knocked out. "nightline" anchor terry moran on the scene from his vantage point. terry? >> reporter: what you have been seeing, the fires you're looking at, that's the concern they have here. this is an u
schools... and not other states. anncr: and so do elected leaders of both parties... councilman john olszewski: new jobs and a stronger economy. endorsed by the naacp, police and firefighters small business owner: good jobs... teacher: and better schools construction worker: vote for question seven. some of them seeing the damage. over all a lot of people out here feeling that they may have dodged a bullet but you know at the same time we're not quite sure that the worse is over yet if the waters keep rising. >> this equaling the sentiment of government officials who say do not let your guard down yet. have you seen police patrolling the streets. >> reporter: we haven't seen many. but we have seen them as the sun comes up. we've seen state and county service trucks driving around, mainly police. we've seen a lot of police. including the highway patrol out here basically just cruising around. making sure everybody is okay. we did stop and talked to a couple of themes. we stopped one and he was optimistic that the waters had peaked and they were starting to recede. but he didn't really
the very start. he's in lower manhattan. we want to go right away to wabc's john delgiorno. he's flying right now over the coastal town of bricktown, new jersey. john, i know firefighters can't get there yet. what are you seeing? >> thank you, george. you're liking at a fire burning in one of the hardest hit areas of the jersey shore. you're looking at mantoloking. this fire apparently being fed by natural gas. very dramatic earlier this morning. power is out for miles around. this area is completely inaccessible right now. by new channels that have been cut into the peninsula as the ocean meets the bay. the whole area is covered in five to ten feet of sand. back to times square. >> thank you so much. >>> we have more on the massive destruction on the jersey shore from the ground level. so much of that iconic beach town of seaside heights is underwater. full of debris there. parts of that famous boardwalk wiped out. "nightline" anchor terry moran is there this morning with the latest on the scene from his vantage point. terry? >> reporter: what you are seeing up the beach, those fires y
with after sandy. john schriffen has the latest on the controversy. >> reporter: good morning. it is a tricky political decision for the city. run this massive marathon, despite the serious issues plaguing the city? possibly creating more chaos? or cancel an iconic event that could bring millions of much-needed money to small businesses. new york's mayor says the starting gun will fire here. still damaged streets filled with 40,000 runners and millions of onlookers. >> we expect by sunday, most of the power will be back, if not all of it. >> reporter: dis350i9 the efforts to bring the power grid and subways online. there's concern that much of the course will not be back to normal, clogging commuter routes. and many are questioning whether a city crippled by a storm should be focusing on a race instead of recovery. >> it seems wrong, if one police officer leaves his job to work at a road race. >> reporter: the race begins in the city's most difficult-to-reach borough, one hard-hit by the storm. >> it starts at staten island near the bridge. we've been cleaning up that area. and it's on main r
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)